Tag Archives: 14th century

Automata of the Middle Ages

This topic is one of the interesting intersections between my medieval research and my current research into Chinese technology. Some of the earliest known automated figures are clock jacks–figures that come out and do something when a clock strikes a … Continue reading

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Stretching things out: Hanged, Drawn and Quartered

During the Middle Ages, execution was a big deal–usually a very public big deal, with citizens gathering from all around to witness the event, both as a celebration of justice (the king’s and therefore, the Lord’s) and a warning to … Continue reading

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Little House in the City–London, that is

One of the best parts of my job is claiming tax deductions on trips to England for research. The first time I went, I specifically needed to know what it felt like in a 14th century house. I wanted to … Continue reading

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Deleted Settings: The Traitors’ Gate

The Tower of London, built by William the Conqueror to dominate his new capital, has a long and fascinating history well worth reading up on. As I approached The Dark Apostle series, and especially the second book, Elisha Magus, it … Continue reading

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Longing for Spring: researching a historical garden

In just a few months, on July 1, Elisha Magus, book 2 in my Dark Apostle series, will hit the bookstores. Needless to say, I am thrilled. But when my window shows a snowy landscape, and my radio suggests that … Continue reading

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Religious Influence on Medical Care, A Historical Perspective

A couple of recent court cases and the advent of recent changes to health insurance law have brought the issue of who controls the patient’s access to health care into the public mind, particularly in relation to religious freedom. Should … Continue reading

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Meanwhile, Back in 14th Century Egypt

Like many American and European historical enthusiasts, especially those brought into the Medieval fold by way of fantasy literature, my immediate focus tends to be on the history of Europe. We love the castles, the kings, the knights, the tales … Continue reading

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More on the Scandalous 14th Century

In our last entry, I was summarizing the fascinating story of King Edward II of England. We’d just reached the point where his estranged wife, Isabelle, returns from a visit home to France, in the company of exiled traitor Roger … Continue reading

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Scandal, 14th Century Style

Scandals are all over the news these days, dominating the headlines and the op-ed pages, making some grumble that not enough is being done, others grumble that we’re getting distracted from more important issues. Let me tell you, as juicy … Continue reading

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Infernal Politics: Dante and the Separation of Church and State

So I am reading up on 14th century Rome, as noted earlier, and also listening to a course on tape about epics, and both have suddenly converged on a curious note:  the Medieval origins of the separation of church and … Continue reading

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